Langley House

Address: 57-59 Humber Avenue, Aveley Estate, South Ockendon, Essex
Open: 1952-1973

Another home called Langley Cottage in N14 is where one ISN survivor was placed. ISN do not know if this was a foster home or another LBI children’s home. There is another Langley House which was run by Tower Hamlets and was based in East India Docks Rd.

Number of ISN survivors that lived at Langley House children’s home

6: 4 men and 1 woman between 1952 and 1973

Numbers of children named by ISN survivors as living at Langley House children’s home : 14

8 boys and 6 girls

Numbers of children named in council documents as living in Langley House children’s home: Not known

Residential staff named by ISN survivors as working in Langley House children’s home: 7

6 women and 1 man (1962-8). 1 girl left care as a teenager and her social worker got her a job as a houseparent in Langley House.

Life at Langley House children’s home

The experience of living at this home depended on the managers. ISN survivors relate differing experiences depending on the dates and managers.

‘We were slapped, kicked, not wanted, not loved’

‘We went on a day trip to Hutton Poplars’

‘There was lino on the floor and it was cold – icy- in winter’

‘Auntie M got the stick out of the broom cupboard and whipped my legs’

‘Auntie M couldn’t handle teenagers and had a breakdown’

‘At age 9 I was made to cook Sunday lunch and peel the veg as a punishment. I cried a lot.’

‘The manager mentally abused me. At age 12 I was got out of bed in the night and forced to pack. She said she was sending me to Approved school. I was up all night sobbing. She was mental torture.’

‘We played in the woods – we were gone for hours.’

‘Had a dog Bimbo. I loved him and took him for long walks’

‘I had a friend from school we laughed a lot. I knew I was different. I was self conscious being an orphan especially at the school play when the Mums and Dads came to watch. I had a lot of nightmares.’

‘One day Auntie M was lying on the floor in the kitchen. They called an ambulance and she was having a breakdown. She used to like her VP wine and had always a fag hanging out of her mouth.’

‘Later a young women came who was lovely and kind. She loved horses and hired a van and took us everywhere to horse shows. I went home and came back but there was no vacancy and that is when the nightmare began. I was somewhere with my suitcase on a train on my way to Cuffley.’